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Google shows Android Market access by the various Android versions


News by Brian James Kirk on Friday December 18, 2009.

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Google is helping developers decide which versions of Android they should create applications for by detailing the fragmentation of the various Android versions and their distribution levels, according to a company blog post.

By calculating Android Market visit statistics for the first two weeks of December, the company has provided a valuable means of understanding the popularity of certain Android devices. Currently 54 percent of the market visits are made by Android 1.6 devices, which include the now-updated T-Mobile G1 and myTouch 3G handsets, among numerous others. Twenty-seven percent of the Android market visits are from Android 1.5 handsets, like Motorola's CLIQ. Android version 2.0 and 2.0.1, which are only available on Verizon's DROID (and some limited number of its European-spec Milestone variant), make up an impressive 17.7 percent of the distribution.

Of course, this merely shows which platforms are accessing the Market most, not how many devices are in use. It stands to reason that newer users, such as those with the Motorola DROID, would be checking the market for new apps more frequently than more established users with older devices.

 

MicroNix @ 2:46:46PM EST on Friday December 18, 2009

"It stands to reason that newer users, such as those with the Motorola DROID, would be checking the market for new apps more frequently than more established users with older devices."

Not really since you are always notified when an app has an update. This should even things out since old devices probably have more apps which ups their chance of having an update available to install and thus, a visit to the marketplace.

Michael Oryl @ 3:02:58PM EST on Friday December 18, 2009

Right, that's true. But after some time using a device, people will have the apps they want since they will have their phones mostly setup. Sure, there will be the occasional update or browsing, but a new user is going to spend a lot more time looking around and seeing what is available.

I've got a CLIQ and a DROID. The DROID is newer, and I've spent much more time recently in the market with it since I was trying to get it setup to my liking. I had the CLIQ going already, so I don't need to search as much.

About the author

Brian James Kirk
Brian is a former news editor on MobileBurn.com that freelances in Philadelphia. You can follow him on Twitter as @BrianJamesKirk.

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