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Samsung says its 8-core processor will soon use all 8 cores at once


News by Andrew Kameka on Tuesday September 10, 2013.

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Samsung's eight-core Exynos processor is in the very rare company of having more cores than other chipsets on the market, but it doesn't actually see an advantage to that structure because it never actually uses all eight cores at once. Instead, the Exynos 5 Octa's ARM big.LITTLE infrastructure uses a pair of quad-core processors and decides which to activate based on the intensity of a required activity. The Exynos this-or-that approach will change later this year when Samsung introduces a way for its eight-core processor to simultaneously use all of its included cores.

A new Heterogeneous Multi-Processing (HMP) solution will enable the Exynos 5 Octa to activate all of its cores at once. Instead of having to choose between activating the ARM A15 cores for a demanding task like 3D gaming or using the low-power A7 cores when it's something simpler like playing music, the Exynos 5 Octa will be able to use the A15 and A7 cores in conjunction with each other. The smarter division of work allows Samsung to continue using high-power cores when necessary but activate low-power cores for related activities.

HMP allows for Samsung to build its processor to continue using the A15 cores for 3D gaming but offload some of the tasks to the A7 cores. That will maintain solid performance but have better battery life because of more efficient use of system resources. Samsung is applying the same concept that makes multi-core processors so beneficial to mobile devices. HMP divides workload and assigns tasks to the core best suited to perform it. Having increased flexibility of its eight cores working together will create a more sophisticated way of getting things done.

An upgrade to Exynos 5 Octa with HMP will launch in the fourth quarter of 2013.

source: Samsung

 
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Andrew Kameka
Andrew is MobileBurn.com's managing editor. He is based in Miami, Florida.

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